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Forum » Other Species of Birds » Mynahs » pildren (how to breed mynah in captivity?)
pildren
pildrenDate: Saturday, 2011-07-02, 4:19 PM | Message # 1
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mga sir paano magbreed ng mynah?mron kc akong pair pano set up ng cage?
 
CloudHanzDate: Monday, 2011-07-04, 4:59 AM | Message # 2
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Most of the cages for breeding mynahs are small, walk-in aviaries, measuring for the most part 4’ x 4’ x 6’. They are constructed of either ½” x 1” or ½” x 3” wire. Some portion of the wire top is exposed to the elements while about half of the area is covered by fiberglass or sheet metal, particularly the area over the feed station and the nest box. In some cases the boxes are hung on the outside; in others we must enter, or partially enter the flight to check the nest. We do this as little as possible as one of the difficulties in breeding mynahs is their propensity to throw out eggs or newly hatched chicks when disturbed. Perches are natural branches, mostly acacia and are in the shelter as well as the open areas. Many of the birds will become soaked in the rain, but most prefer to bathe in the large shallow bowls provided. We have bred them in much larger flights, up to 16’ long, as well as in suspended cages, set up like our lories.

In most instances our cages are side by side with no visual barriers between the pairs. Most share a common wall. If we do happen to see aggression between neighboring birds, we simply relocate one of the pairs and the problem goes away. There have been a couple of rare occasions where the male has injured the hen in his attempt to force her to nest. In one case the hen was killed. I have seen this more often with the Javas than with the Greaters.

Nest boxes are cleaned out as necessary, even out of breeding season, as often the birds will perch in the opening and foul the inside of the box. Many of the pairs are under trees, either acacia or eucalyptus, and they collect the fallen leaves themselves for nest construction. We also provide them with strips of palm frond, as these are very pliable when green and they help add humidity to the nest. The nest boxes themselves vary a little bit, usually whatever was available when setting up the cages. Most are about 12” square and 18”-20” deep. We have also used boot boxes with success. The inspection door should be far enough above the floor of the box to allow for the 4-6 inches of leaves and feathers that make up the nest. Otherwise the nest will cover the inspection hole and you will have to disturb the nest to check on eggs or chicks.
The birds will eat dry as well, but I feel that when they are feeding chicks they should have soft food and not try and force a dry pellet into a small baby. Keeping in mind the mynahs’ tendency toward iron storage disease, we are careful to keep the diet as free from iron as possible. We provide mealworms daily, many more when there are chicks in the nest. Some individual birds also like crickets, which we feed frozen/thawed, but only to those pairs that will eat them, otherwise we will have ants to deal with. We feed just once a day, but return in the afternoon to make certain that live food is always available when chicks are present as many birds seem to feed only live food, especially the first week or so. The mealworms are kept in chicken mash and are dusted before feeding with Birdymin Plus vitamins. These vitamins are sprinkled on the fruit mix most days as well.

When all goes well, 3, sometimes 4 blue eggs will be laid and the hen will be in the box most of the day. We have some pairs that are off the nest in an instant, so quickly that you are lucky to catch them sitting. Often you don’t know that you have eggs for a few days. Other pairs will sit regardless of what is going on, or peer out of the box at feeding time, but not completely exit the nest. Once we know we have eggs, we note the date and expect to find a discarded shell on the floor in 14 days. They usually remove the shells to a site as far from the nest as possible. It is easy to tell if the shell is from a hatched chick, as it will be in a neat half. On the other hand, an egg that has been tossed by the parents will usually be mostly intact, but have a large hole punched in it where they made a “handle” to remove it from the nest. If more than 3 chicks hatch it is important to monitor the nest frequently, as sometimes the smaller one will fall far behind its’ siblings and become part of the food chain itself. If this looks to be happening we of course pull the baby for hand rearing, whatever the age.

We leave the chicks with the parents for 10 days to 2 weeks. They are easier to hand feed if taken before their eyes open, as they are not afraid of you at that stage. If you wait too long it will be necessary to force the beak open the first few feedings, but they will come around and gape when hungry. We use Cerelac Stage 1 mixed with a little pureed papaya, and fed with a 10cc syringe. Unlike a parrot, a mynah has no crop, so it requires frequent feedings of small amounts. We feed every hour or so at first, stretching it to 2 hours by 3 weeks of age. By the time the chicks are 2-3 weeks old we no longer use the hand feeding formula, but switch to the diced fruit and soaked pellets that the parents receive. We do not offer mealworms when hand feeding as it isn’t necessary. Many of our adults will not eat the worms except while breeding and feeding young. For a few of the pairs breeding season will extend into September, but most have called it quits in early August. We find our pairs to be inconsistent, as the most productive pair one year may destroy all of their eggs the next, and a pair that laid but a single egg last year will suddenly be the “best” pair this year. I guess that is just another of the things
that makrs breeding mynahs a challenge. If you need to justify your bird keeping by bringing in a little income, then take a good look at the Hill Mynahs, as the waiting lists are growing right along with their prices with all of us who breed them.
 
birdmanDate: Friday, 2012-01-13, 6:41 PM | Message # 3
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pano po malalaman if male or female? any sign,marker or size diff? TIA
 
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